How Contemporary Female Artists Are Grappling with Sexual Violence in Their Work

Curator Monika Fabijanska talks about her exhibition The Un-Heroic Act, and arts journalist Barbara Pollack chats about her new book on an emerging generation of Chinese contemporary artists. Hrag VartanianJuly 27, 2018 In this episode, I talk to curator Monika Fabijanska about her important fall exhibition The Un-Heroic Act: Representations of Rape in Contemporary Women’s Art in the

Murder She Said

Am I looking at an image of a dress on the ground covered with leaves? Is it from a lover’s tryst, or is something more sinister going on, and why would I think that?

On the whole, media and society have turned darker and more aggressive as we’ve moved into the 21st century. Being besieged with nominally factual content has constrained us all to a different type of viewing, more of a true-crime voyeurism than ever — inundated with reality or its simulacrum on television and computer screens on a daily basis, we wonder how we ended up here. When did we start needing to see unedited live-steamed reality of life’s most horrific moments? The true-crime program America’s Most Wanted premiered in 1988. I remember it well because I was studying video and art history for my undergraduate degree at Tufts — it was hard to ignore the fact that a social boundary had been crossed when watching videos of real criminals being hunted down for horrible crimes, as well as listening to their victims and families reliving events for an audience hungry for only its most salacious details.

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