How Contemporary Female Artists Are Grappling with Sexual Violence in Their Work

Curator Monika Fabijanska talks about her exhibition The Un-Heroic Act, and arts journalist Barbara Pollack chats about her new book on an emerging generation of Chinese contemporary artists. Hrag VartanianJuly 27, 2018 In this episode, I talk to curator Monika Fabijanska about her important fall exhibition The Un-Heroic Act: Representations of Rape in Contemporary Women’s Art in the

THE UN-HEROIC ACT: Representations of Rape in Contemporary Women’s Art in the U.S.

On view: September 4 – November 2, 2018
Opening Reception: September 12, 5:30-8:30 PM
Symposium: October 3, 5-9 PM in the Moot Court, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Curated by Monika Fabijanska

Transplants: Greek Diaspora Artists

SYMPOSIUM: May 2, 2018, from 4:00-5:30 pm in Room L2.84, New Building 

On Display from May 2nd, 2018, through June 28th, 2018

 

The Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York, proudly presents Transplants: Greek Diaspora Artists. This exhibition will be accompanied by a symposium moderated by the show’s curator Dr. Thalia Vrachopoulos, at 4 PM the same day, in Room L2.84, New Building with guest speakers Professor Nicholas Alexiou of Queens College, Dr. George Andreopoulos a Professor of Political Science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and at the Graduate Center, Peter Gerakaris, and art critic Jonathan Goodman.

Panel Discussion: Art and Immigration Policy

Time: April 11, 2018; 6:30-8:30 PM

Location:Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery

Description: This panel will draw upon the themes raised by “Internalized Borders,” an exhibition that examines the ways that language and legal systems create internal and external borders. Visual Culture and language have a profound effect on how we as a country vote in political elections and also affect the national point of view. Historically, the cultural production of such images and language defined how people were seen by their governing institutions and by society in general. Some of the language created to define them has stayed permanently in the system or been challenged by society. What is the responsibility of lawmakers, historians, and cultural producers, in how we define people currently and in the future?

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