Past Events

Apocalypse: Then and Now

On view: February 13, 2019 – April 5, 2019

Opening Reception: February 13, 2019, 5:30 – 8:00 PM

Curated by Dr. Thalia Vrachopoulos

The exhibition “Apocalypse: Then and Now”reflects sinister omens for the future as seen in ourdaily life and reported news. In a world overwhelmed with wars, instability, and violence, the earth is exceedingly threatened by nuclear catastrophe.In response to these circumstances, the participating artists confront and examine the issue of nuclear extinction. At a time when nuclear threat is sharplyincreasing from North Korea, China, Russia,and the Middle East, the possibility of a holocaust has threatened widespread destruction and the eventual collapse of civilization. In this scenario, large portions of the earth would become uninhabitable due to radioactivity and fallout, the destruction of cities and their infrastructures, lack of sanitation, nuclear firestorms, widespread radiation sickness, the loss of electricity, and the failureof communications.In general, a nuclear winter would ensue. This radioactive winter has been predicted by scientists such as Alan Robock, who stated that it would be lasting and actually bring the modern world to an end. Extinction would follow as a result of societal fragmentation, environmental consequences, and, in general, economic and social collapse.
All the artists in this exhibition have produced works on the subject of nuclear war in the hopes of preserving future generations and preventing a holocaust. They have sought to awaken the public to a threat that is unseen yet imminent. About a year ago, we experienced nuclear threats from North Korea.Today it is China, and there’s always the possibility of a nuclear explosion arising from conflict in the Middle East. Living conditions for large portions of world populations have become untenable, and for the whole world, a nuclear winter is a probability–unless we embrace accountability.
Artists Terry OwnbyGoro Nakamura, and Jessie Boylan have photographed past disasters, such as the one that occurred in Chernobyl, Ukraine, 1996;and in Fukushima, 2011; Tokaimura, 1997; and Three Mile Island, 1979. Elin O’Hara-Slavick,David McMillan, Takashi Arai, Isao Hashimoto,Vincent Parisot, and Hiroshi Sunariare interested in showing the results of nuclear fallout at such test sites as Los Alamos, Hanford, Rocky Flats, Techa River, Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, and Lake Karachay. Panos Charalambides and Mary Chairetaki use references from various civil defense publications that are relics of the cold war era. Thus, they add to their art an authoritative power, brought about by their use of a bizarrely detached and unfeeling approach toward the life-threatening event of an imminent nuclear war. Kazuma ObaraNick MooreDominick Lombardi,Michael McKeown,and Eirini Linardaki allude to nuclear catastrophe through more general art frameworks rather than to depict specific events.

 

Fomore information pleascontact:

 

The Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

860 11thAvenue
New York, NY  10019
gallery@jjay.cuny.edu
212-237-1439
www.shivagallery.org

GallerHours:10AM6PMMF

AbouJohn Jay College oCriminaJustice :  An internationaleadeieducating fojusticeJohn Jay CollegoCriminaJustice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards o15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law.                      

Image courtesy of Goro Nakamura and the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

THE UN-HEROIC ACT: Representations of Rape in Contemporary Women’s Art in the U.S.

On view: September 4 – November 3, 2018
(We are also open on October 20th, 27th and November 3rd from 12 – 6 PM.)
Opening Reception: September 12, 5:30-8:30 PM
Symposium: October 3, 5-9 PM in the Moot Court, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
The symposium was streamed live and you can view it here
Exhibition Tour and Artist Talk: October 24, 6-8 PM at the main gallery
A gallery tour with curator Monika Fabijanska followed by a discussion with artists Roya Amigh, Angela Fraleigh, and Lynn Hershman Leeson on what means artists employ to tell personal stories. Lynn Hershman Leeson’s Electronic Diary Part III: First Person Plural (1988, color, sound, 28 min), will be screened as part of the event.

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Transplants: Greek Diaspora Artists

SYMPOSIUM: May 2, 2018, from 4:00-5:30 pm in Room L2.84, New Building 

On Display from May 2nd, 2018, through June 28th, 2018

 

The Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York, proudly presents Transplants: Greek Diaspora Artists. This exhibition will be accompanied by a symposium moderated by the show’s curator Dr. Thalia Vrachopoulos, at 4 PM the same day, in Room L2.84, New Building with guest speakers Professor Nicholas Alexiou of Queens College, Dr. George Andreopoulos a Professor of Political Science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and at the Graduate Center, Peter Gerakaris, and art critic Jonathan Goodman. Read More »

Panel Discussion: Art and Immigration Policy

Time: April 11, 2018; 6:30-8:30 PM

Location:Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery

Description: This panel will draw upon the themes raised by “Internalized Borders,” an exhibition that examines the ways that language and legal systems create internal and external borders. Visual Culture and language have a profound effect on how we as a country vote in political elections and also affect the national point of view. Historically, the cultural production of such images and language defined how people were seen by their governing institutions and by society in general. Some of the language created to define them has stayed permanently in the system or been challenged by society. What is the responsibility of lawmakers, historians, and cultural producers, in how we define people currently and in the future? Read More »

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